Crime

 

Hi everyone.

Our theme for this week’s IELTS exercises will be crime.

A number of students have recently attempted an IELTS Writing Task 2 question that asks them to discuss the problem of rising crime.  We will use this task as the base for a set of exercises across all four IELTS skills.

On Monday I will post a vocabulary  that may help you with the exercises.

Tuesday’s reading exercise will be an extract from an article on increasing crime rates.  You will be asked to complete sentences with the correct endings.

Wednesday’s writing exercise will be based on the IELTS Writing Task 2 format.  You will be asked to discuss the impact of rising crime rates.

Thursday’s listening exercise will be a recording of me reading another article related to crime.  You will be asked to choose correct answers from three alternatives.

Friday’s speaking exercise will require you to speak for two minutes on a topic related to crime in your own country.

If you have registered with The IELTS Guy, you will receive suggested answers by email over the weekend.

If you have subscribed to The IELTS Guy, you will receive personalized feedback on your responses.

As always, feedback and comments are welcome.

Good Luck!

The IELTS Guy

History – IELTS Suggested Answers

 

Hi everyone.

I hope you have enjoyed our exercises this week.  My suggested responses are as follows:

Reading

The commonsense view states that there are certain basic facts which are the same for all historians.

The historian is entitled to rely on the auxiliary sciences of history.

Journalists know that the best way to influence public opinion is by the selection and arrangement of the appropriate facts.

A fact is said to be like a sack, because it won’t stand up until you put something in it.

The reason for interest in the Battle of Hastings is that historians regard it as a major historical event

It is preposterous to believe that a hard core of historical facts exists independently of the interpretation of the historian.

Writing

In most IELTS Writing 1 tasks involving pie charts you will be given 2 or more charts to compare.  For this exercise, I presented only one pie chart to give you the opportunity to practice description without the complication of needing to compare charts.

This pie chart shows the choice of thesis category made by students studying history at a university in 2018.  Seven different thesis categories are depicted, and the results are given as percentages.  Overall, Ancient Greece and The Reformation were the most popular choices, accounting for half of the total responses.

The single most commonly chosen thesis topic was Ancient Rome with 30%, followed by The Reformation at 20%.  Medieval Europe was next with 17%.  Ancient Greece and The Renaissance were each chosen by 12% of students, and the two smallest proportions of students were represented by Egypt of the Pharoahs and Modern History with 6% and 3% respectively.  END

As you can see, it is possible to fully describe a single pie chart in around 100 words.  When dealing with multiple charts, as we will do in future exercises, it will be important to remember that it is not possible to describe every detail or your essay will run too long.

Listening

The answers are:

  1.  B
  2.  C
  3.  A

Speaking

My suggested response can be viewed below.  Sorry that the video cuts out rather abruptly at the end – my battery ran out!

 

Subscribers to The IELTS Guy can submit their own responses for personalized feedback.

As always, comments and feedback are welcome.  Next week we will be creating exercises around the theme of Crime.

Regards

The IELTS Guy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good Luck!

The IELTS Guy

History – IELTS Speaking Exercise

 

Hi everyone.

This week’s speaking exercise is based on the IELTS individual long turn format.

Take one minute to prepare, and then speak for 3-4 minutes on the following topic:

Describe an historical event that you are familiar with.  You should include:

  • Details of when and where the event took place
  • The names of the major actors
  • An explanation of why this event was important.

Please note that the people involved in historical events are sometimes referred to as “actors”.

Good Luck!

The IELTS Guy

History – IELTS Listening Exercise

 

Hi everyone.

This week’s listening exercise is based on the IELTS multiple choice format.

Listen to the reading in the attached video clip, and answer the following questions:

Choose the correct answer: A, B or C.

1  At Stalybridge Wakes in 1850, a gingerbread vendor was

A.  arrested by police

B.  kicked to death

C.  identified as a famous historian

 

2  When the author studied ancient history, his special subject was:

A.  Athens

B.  Corinth

C.  Greece in the period of the Persian Wars

 

3.  History has been called:

A.  an enormous jigsaw with a lot of missing parts

B.  a manageable compass

C.  membership of a select club

 

 

 

 

As always, feedback and comments are welcome.

Good Luck!

The IELTS Guy

History – IELTS Writing Exercise

 

Hi everyone.

This week’s writing exercise is based on the IELTS Writing Task 1 format.

The chart below summarizes the thesis category selected by history students at a university in 2018.  Summarize the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

Write at least 150 words.

ielts graph pic

 

 

The IELTS Guy

History – IELTS Reading Exercise

 

Hi everyone!

This week’s IELTS Reading Exercise is based on the IELTS matching sentence endings  format.

Read the following passage from What is History? by E.H. Carr , which contains each of the words from yesterday’s vocabulary list.  Complete each sentence with the correct ending, A-F.

  1. The commonsense view states that
  2. The historian is entitled to rely on
  3. Journalists know that the best way to influence public opinion is
  4. A fact is said to be like a sack, because
  5. The reason for interest in the Battle of Hastings is that
  6. It is preposterous to believe that

 

A. The auxiliary sciences of history

B.  It won’t stand up until you put something in it

C.  By the selection and arrangement of the appropriate facts

D. Historians regard it as a major historical event

E. There are certain basic facts which are the same for all historians.

F. A hard core of historical facts exists independently of the interpretation of the historian.

 

 

What is a historical fact?. This is a crucial question into which we must look a little more closely. According to the commonsense view, there are certain basic facts which are the same for all historians and which form, so to speak, the backbone of history – the fact, for example, that the Battle of Hastings was fought in 1066. But this view calls for two observations. In the first place, it is not with facts like these that the historian is primarily concerned. It is no doubt important to know that the great battle was fought in 1066 and not in 1065 or 1067, and that it was fought at Hastings and not at Eastbourne or Brighton. The historian must not get these things wrong. But, when points of this kind are raised, I am reminded of Housman’s remark that ‘accuracy is a duty, not a virtue’.

To praise a historian for his accuracy is like praising an architect for using well-seasoned timber or properly mixed concrete in his building. It is a necessary condition of his work, but not his essential function. It is precisely for matters of this kind that the historian is entitled to rely on what have been called the’ auxiliary sciences’ of history – archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, chronology, and so forth. The historian is not required to have the special skills which enable the expert to determine the origin and period of a fragment of pottery or marble, to decipher an obscure inscription, or to make the elaborate astronomical calculations necessary to establish a precise date. These so-called basic facts, which are the same for all historians, commonly belong to the category of the raw materials of the historian rather than of history itself. The second observation is that the necessity to establish these basic facts rests not on any quality in the facts themselves, but on an a priori decision of the historian. In spite of C. P. Scott’s motto, every journalist knows today that the most effective way to influence opinion is by the selection and arrangement of the appropriate facts. It used to be said that facts speak for themselves. This is, of course, untrue. The facts speak only when the historian calls on them: it is he who decides to which facts to give the floor, and in what order or context. It was, I think, one of Pirandello’s characters who said that a fact is like a sack – it won’t stand up till you’ve put something in it. The only reason why we are interested to know that the battle was fought at Hastings in 1066 is that historians regard it as a major historical event. It is the historian who has decided for his own reasons that Caesar’s crossing of that petty stream, the Rubicon, is a fact of history, whereas the crossing of the Rubicon by millions of other people before or since interests nobody at all. The fact that you arrived in this building half an hour ago on foot, or on a bicycle, or in a car, is just as much a fact about the past as the fact that Caesar crossed the Rubicon. But it will probably be ignored by historians. Professor Talcott Parsons once called science’ a selective system of cognitive orientations to reality’.  l It might perhaps have been put more simply. But history is, among other things, that. The historian is necessarily selective. The belief in a hard core of historical facts existing objectively and independently of the interpretation of the historian is a preposterous fallacy, but one which it is very hard to eradicate.

E.H Carr, “What is History”.

As always, feedback and comments are welcome.

Enjoy!

The IELTS Guy

History – IELTS Vocabulary

 

Hi everyone.

Our theme for this week’s IELTS exercises is history.

To help you complete the exercises, especially the reading, you may like to ensure that you are familiar with each of the following words:

Historian

Historical

Crucial

Observation

Virtue

Essential

Fragment

Decipher

Astronomical

Motto

Preposterous

Eradicate.

The reading exercise will be posted tomorrow.

Good Luck!

The IELTS Guy